Back to the ranch, our diarist lady and her family re-establish the rhythms of ranching life.  One of the those rhythms is lots of visiting by the menfolk, who seem to be taking this early spring weekend off…

“Fri. April 7

We left Potomac about nine and got to Clearwater about 2.

Rested there about an hr & got home about 6 pm. Was certainly glad to get there too.

Ruth had the house all nice & clean & supper all ready to get quick.

Baby had a nice dose of colic after we got home & didn’t sleep well all nite.

Warm but no sun.  Mama & I were surely tired.

Keagle made his first trip with the truck & had to have supper here.

Sat. April 8.

No one had a great lot of pip.  And little Dorma was cross with the belly ache all day.

Mama had an old head ache all day.  Ruth made a cake.

Fritz & Herman O. were here.

Keagle & 2 other men were here for dinner.

Sun. April 9.

No one did much but what had to be done.

Glen came over in P.m. and stayed quite late.

Baby was cross in p.m. & took up most of the attention.  Drim (?) & H. Ostromire was here in evening.

Men played cards.”

Okay Dear Readers, I’m having a hard time — no, an impossible time — picturing any men’s card game without beer.

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Yet on this occasion and throughout her stay in Missoula, our lady diarist has been silent on the subject of alcohol.  This is sensible since Prohibition was in high gear in 1922, enacted across the country less than two years before (though Montanans fought it vigorously: see next posting).  But a cold one might have been welcome to a woman too, after a long day of cooking, cleaning, and dealing with a grumpy colicky infant.

Anyhow if there was illicit beer in the house, it could have been a variant of Highlander, a red Scottish ale brewed in Missoula beginning in 1910.  Scottish ales are very popular in Montana today: Highlander has been revived, and Cold Smoke is a favorite.

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