Archives for category: beer
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Clint and I drinking “Gold Un Ale” Mandatory Draft, the latest offering at 23 Beer Tasting Room in Taipei. A keg-hopped golden ale that adds zest to the usual light smooth flavor!

Taiwan is home to two beer cultures: the first is the working man/woman’s beer which is a light lager similar to–but tastier than–American Coors or Bud. It is aptly called Taiwan Beer. There is a second, younger beer culture based on micros. We sampled some of these at the 23 Bar just around the corner from my faculty dorm (No. 100, Section 1, Xinhai Road, Da’an District, Taipei City).

For good beer karma, my boyfriend Clint brought several packets of Centennial Hops all the way from Brewer’s Haven, Boise, Idaho (we now call him the Hops Mule). His luggage smells delightfully hoppy now.

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My other favorite is the No. 1 Pale Ale, also keg-hopped. Fragrant hoppy happiness and a light brown nutty vibe.

 

To continue on the theme of booze and how hard it would have been to find some during the time our mystery diarist was writing: I found the below at http://100megsfree3.com/mickmc/rich2.html, accessed 1/19/14.

“Prohibition began in 1920 and continued throughout the ’20s.  Officials (in Montana) knew they were fighting an uphill battle.

Not only would liquor come in by air, but also a ground route for rum-running stretched from Great Falls north to the Canadian line.  Dubbed Bootlegger Trail, a name still used, it allowed whiskey to flow illegally from Canada.

In addition, do-it-yourself violators were so numerous Phohibition agents could not keep up.  When they did bust a transgressor, the reception was chilly.

Just before Halloween in 1923, state prohibition officers entered the home of Mrs. Charles Wilbur (in Great Falls) armed with a search warrant.   As Gene Van Wert, a state officer, bent over to examine two gallons of moonshine liquor, she knocked him behind the ear with an ax, then clubbed a Wert aide in the head as well.

“Her skill at swinging the ax is not up to the standards set by woodsmen, for which fact the officers give thanks,” the Great Falls Tribune reported October 20th.   Mrs. Wilbur was disarmed, then arrested, then was released because she had several small children.

By March, 1924, a Tribune editorial bemoaned widespread violations of Prohibition laws, citing an estimate that half of Montana’s liquor violations were flatly ignored.

“The way in which boys and girls in their teens have become addicts of the ‘hip flask’ shocks the federal authorities,” the Tribune said.  Montana’s half-wet, half-dry status placed the state on a par with nearby Minnesota, North Dakota, Washington and Oregon in only half enforcing Prohibition laws…

By 1926, Montanans were fed up with the alcohol ban, passing a referendum that removed the state from the Prohibition enforcement business.  Federal agents would have to police liquor violations alone.”

Wow!  As regards the sentiment of Montanans then and now, the below photo about sums it up:

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So even if it was on the down-low, I’m about sure that there was beer at that card game on our diarist’s little ranch, that damp spring of 1922.

Back to the ranch, our diarist lady and her family re-establish the rhythms of ranching life.  One of the those rhythms is lots of visiting by the menfolk, who seem to be taking this early spring weekend off…

“Fri. April 7

We left Potomac about nine and got to Clearwater about 2.

Rested there about an hr & got home about 6 pm. Was certainly glad to get there too.

Ruth had the house all nice & clean & supper all ready to get quick.

Baby had a nice dose of colic after we got home & didn’t sleep well all nite.

Warm but no sun.  Mama & I were surely tired.

Keagle made his first trip with the truck & had to have supper here.

Sat. April 8.

No one had a great lot of pip.  And little Dorma was cross with the belly ache all day.

Mama had an old head ache all day.  Ruth made a cake.

Fritz & Herman O. were here.

Keagle & 2 other men were here for dinner.

Sun. April 9.

No one did much but what had to be done.

Glen came over in P.m. and stayed quite late.

Baby was cross in p.m. & took up most of the attention.  Drim (?) & H. Ostromire was here in evening.

Men played cards.”

Okay Dear Readers, I’m having a hard time — no, an impossible time — picturing any men’s card game without beer.

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Yet on this occasion and throughout her stay in Missoula, our lady diarist has been silent on the subject of alcohol.  This is sensible since Prohibition was in high gear in 1922, enacted across the country less than two years before (though Montanans fought it vigorously: see next posting).  But a cold one might have been welcome to a woman too, after a long day of cooking, cleaning, and dealing with a grumpy colicky infant.

Anyhow if there was illicit beer in the house, it could have been a variant of Highlander, a red Scottish ale brewed in Missoula beginning in 1910.  Scottish ales are very popular in Montana today: Highlander has been revived, and Cold Smoke is a favorite.